Doctor Parent Vaccine Question Form & FAQ

  • Doctors have generously offered to answer questions about the COVID vaccine for children. If you have a question regarding the COVID vaccine, please fill out the Google Form below and a physician will respond to your question as soon as possible.

    Click here to submit a question. 

    Click here to access Pediatric Vaccines: Top 8 Parental Concerns Answered" - by Katelyn Jetelina - Your Local Epidemiologist

    Information about the doctors who have volunteered to answer questions can be found below:

    Dr. Atsuko Koyama is a board-certified pediatric emergency medicine and adolescent medicine physician in Phoenix and clinical assistant professor of Child Health and Emergency Medicine at University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix. She is a proud parent of a Madison School District student, who will be vaccinated against COVID-19.

    Dr. Ruth Franks Snedecor is a board-certified internal medicine physician in Phoenix and clinical associate professor at the University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix. She has been advising the Madison School District regarding pandemic mitigation measures since June of 2020. She is a proud parent to three Covid-19 vaccinated children who attend school in the Madison School District.

    Dr. Sheetal Shah is a board-certified pediatric emergency medicine physician in Phoenix and clinical assistant professor of Child Health and Emergency Medicine at University of Arizona College of Medicine Phoenix. Proud parent of children who attend Madison School District and who will be vaccinated against COVID-19.

    Dr. Yarden Tahan is a board-certified family medicine physician who sees patient of all ages from pediatrics to geriatrics and everything in between. She has two children in the Madison school district who will both be fully vaccinated against COVID-19.

    Dr. Jason Vargas has been a board-certified private practice pediatrician at Cactus Children’s Clinic in Glendale Arizona since 2004. He is the current Board President for the Arizona Chapter of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Dr Vargas is also a proud parent of children who have attended Madison Schools.

    The Madison Elementary School District (“District”) does not endorse the information provided by the volunteer doctors.  Any information disseminated about the COVID vaccine for children is provided as a service to the District community. THIS IS NOT A SUBSTITUE FOR A CONSULTATION WITH YOUR OWN HEALTHCARE PROVIDER. Please consult with your own physician for medical advice for you or your child, especially if you have an urgent/emergent health concern. 

    This is a shared form created by the volunteer doctors.  The District will also have access to the form.  Submitted questions should not include any identifying information about yourself or your child.  Questions to volunteer doctors that are off topic will not be answered. 

    Vaccine FAQ

    1) How soon after having Covid infection can children get vaccinated?

    People with COVID-19 who have symptoms should wait to be vaccinated until they have recovered from their illness and have met the criteria for discontinuing isolation; those without symptoms should also wait until they meet the criteria before getting vaccinated. This guidance also applies to people who get COVID-19 before getting their second dose of vaccine.

    People who have had a known COVID-19 exposure should not seek vaccination until their quarantine period has ended to avoid potentially exposing healthcare personnel and others during the vaccination visit. This recommendation also applies to people with a known COVID-19 exposure who have received their first dose of an mRNA vaccine but not their second. 

    If you or your child have a history of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in adults or children (MIS-A or MIS-C), consider delaying vaccination until you or your child have recovered from being sick and for 90 days after the date of diagnosis of MIS-A or MIS-C. Learn more about the clinical considerations for people with a history of multisystem MIS-C or MIS-A.

    Reference:

    https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/vaccines/faq.html?s_cid=10528:%2Bif%20%2Byou%20%2Bhad%20%2Bcovid%20%2Bdo%20%2Byou%20%2Bneed%20%2Bthe%20%2Bvaccine:sem.b:p:RG:GM:gen:PTN:FY21

    2) When can the second dose be given? 

    Anytime after 3 weeks from the first vaccine dose.

    3) The events are 4 weeks apart. Is it ok to wait 4 weeks between shots or should we schedule second dose elsewhere?  

    It is OK to wait 4 weeks. That said, if you’d like to go elsewhere, you are welcome to schedule your child’s vaccine 3 weeks after the 1st shot is given. We recommend you provide the site with your child’s vaccine card and any other requested information.

    4) We have not yet received the flu shot. Should we wait a few weeks between the Covid vaccine and flu shot? 

    No, you can get both vaccines at the same time.

    5) I had the J&J (adult) and need to get a booster. Can I mix vaccines?

    Yes, adults 18 and over can mix vaccines.

    Evidence is emerging that encourages the mixing of vaccines for the booster. You will have a much higher immune response if you were to select one of the mRNA vaccines such as Pfizer or Moderna after having the Triple J vaccine. See table below:

    COVID Vaccine Booster Info

    6) My kid has asthma and is on Symbicort inhaler. Would this interact with the vaccine? How effective is the vaccine for kids with asthma? 

    The COVID vaccine is unlikely to cause issues with your child’s asthma or Symbicort use. The vaccine has the same efficacy for children with or without asthma. It is highly recommended for children and adults with asthma (similar to flu shots) to prevent moderate to severe complications from COVID infection.

    7) My child just had a couple baby teeth pulled so she is still healing from that.  Should I wait a couple weeks to get her vaccinated?

    No. There are no contraindications to the COVID vaccine after dental procedures. 

    8) Do we feel it's necessary to vaccinate with such a low hospitalization and mortality rate with children? 

    Yes, vaccination is necessary. When we consider COVID-19 and its effects, hospitalization and mortality (death) are not the only factors to address. Long term complications are being identified after COVID infection, such as “Long Haulers” or post-acute sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC). Symptoms include fatigue, shortness of breath, cough, joint pain and chest pain. Other issues include cognitive problems, difficulty concentrating, depression, muscle pain, headache, rapid heartbeat and intermittent fever.

    (https://www.hopkinsmedicine.org/health/conditions-and-diseases/coronavirus/covid-long-haulers-long-term-effects-of-covid19)

    In children, the rates of PASC are 7.2% in a most recent study, meaning that for every 20 children at least 1-2 of them will be impacted for months even after an initially mild infection.

    Among 5058 children, mean age was 12.4 years old, 366 (7.2%) exhibited at least one new-onset neuropsychiatric symptom between 90 and 150 days following initial SARS-CoV-2 test positivity. The most common incident symptoms at 90-150 days were headache (2.4%), mood and anxiety symptoms (2.4%), cognitive symptoms (2.3%), and fatigue (1.1%).

    (https://www.medrxiv.org/content/10.1101/2021.09.28.21264259v1)

    Also vaccination is more protective against being infected with COVID-19 again. One study showed that unvaccinated people who already had COVID-19 are more than 2 times as likely than fully vaccinated people to get COVID-19 again.

    (https://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/volumes/70/wr/mm7032e1.htm?s_cid=mm7032e1_e&ACSTrackingID=USCDC_921-DM63289&ACSTrackingLabel=MMWR%20Early%20Release%20-%20Vol.%2070%2C%20August%206%2C%202021&deliveryName=USCDC_921-DM63289 

     

    The Madison Elementary School District (“District”) does not endorse the information provided by the volunteer doctors.  Any information disseminated about the COVID vaccine for children is provided as a service to the District community. THIS IS NOT A SUBSTITUE FOR A CONSULTATION WITH YOUR OWN HEALTHCARE PROVIDER. Please consult with your own physician for medical advice for you or your child, especially if you have an urgent/emergent health concern.